Hannah and Papa J

Hannah and Papa J

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

The perils of naming yourself

Dear Hannah,

One thing that I realized after reading a very thoughtful (and extremely Catholic) essay by Anthony Esolen, was that, in the war over gender pronouns and in nearly everything else, it's generally a terrible thing to name yourself.

Monday, October 24, 2016

In praise of Milo Yiannopoulos

Dear Hannah,

I'll admit upfront that I hated Milo at first.  It was something about the way he treated fat women.  He made himself too much of an ass, taking the issue far beyond the heresy of leftists and turning it into something personal -- something regrettable by anyone who has an overweight mother or a sister.  The people against "fat shaming" (even if what they're against is only stating a preference for fitness) are really against health and beauty and taste, and thus are asking for every ounce of their thrashing.  The overweight, on the other hand, are only overweight; and so long as they aren't demanding admiration for their fatness, or forcing us to say that everyone is beautiful, may make us wince at the thought of them in a bikini, but often make up for their unattractiveness with what we refer to as a personality*.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

The American Dream and its critics

Dear Hannah,

Because I was in college I've done several things I wouldn't do now, at the top of the list being a beer bong with more than seven types of hard alcohol, voting as a Democrat, and reading Michael Moore.  The latter of these took place in small apartment after I quit riding the white horse and picked up some Chomsky, and involved a book much longer than it needed to be about something like Oprah Winfrey becoming president.  It was brilliantly titled Dude, Where's My Country?  One of the chapters has stuck with me more than the one about Oprah being an ideal presidential candidate, however, and it had to do with the fraudulence of the American Dream.

Monday, October 3, 2016

Welfare queens and their defenders

Dear Hannah,

If the editors of The Atlantic had ever seen Lost, they might remember a scene when Sawyer the con-man explains his father's philosophy of stealing.  It runs in short that no matter who you are or what you do for a living, you're either taking or giving too much -- but you're never getting what you deserve.  The whole world is alternating between stealing or being stolen from.  The professional thief (and maybe even the saint) argues that he's separated from humanity only in name.  A saner man would say that the difference between the thief and the rest of us is a matter of degree.